Exercise: Vertical and horizontal frames.

This exercise took me quite some time, simply due to the volume of photographs required. I couldn't seem to find a compact location where I could rattle all 40 images off; consequently they are pretty diverse. I was keen to make as many of the images interesting in their own right rather than purely demonstrate the potential of portrait against landscape shots. Some of the images do definitely work better in the portrait orientation, but not all of them. However, all of the portrait images do, I think, stand up in their own right.

Not perhaps the purists choice bit I think this works quite well in portrait format. The landscape orientation is more traditional and is more suited to the palace's shape, but portrait allows for emphasis of the body of water and of the sky.

Portrait work well here due to the narrow parallel arrangement of the trees.

The church tower is much better in a portrait orientation, although neither look great due to the converging verticals.

This pair is neither here nor there to be honest. I forced these images through but had to point the camera through another fence to do so and they haven't really emphasised the point.

Perhaps not portrait at its best but it does have its selling points. The path and river both extend along the length of the frame, in a similar manner to the railway platform below.

This glass of sherry is undoubtedly more suited to portrait.

I think this image would have worked better as a portrait image had I frame it better. The shape of the gravestone, the door and the windows all all more portrait than landscape.

This is a slightly odd take on a traditional human portrait where the shape of the person means a portrait orientation works best,

Both the portrait and landscape work well for this view.

This 'portrait landscape' works reasonable well but isn't perhaps the best orientation. Which I suppose is understandable!

In this image, I like how the basketball ring is included in the frame; it is cut off in the landscape view.

I like the portrait orientation for this image as it brings the tower block more into the frame. The dour feel is enhanced by its looming presence.

This postbox calls for the portrait orientation. Landscape just doesn't seem to work due to the additional content detracting from the subject.

This postbox calls for the portrait orientation. Landscape just doesn't seem to work due to the additional content detracting from the subject.

This image works well in portrait orientation as several of the components lend themselves to the upright shape. The yellow line, the track and the platform all extend almost vertically away from the camera.

This image works quite well as it shows the extent of the flooding of the river Thames, with the water coming closer to the camera than in the landscape shot. It also mimics the shape of the sign.